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Friday, April 13th, 2012 | Author:

What can be called a historic decision, the highest court of India has upheld the constitution validity of the RTE, (Right to Education Act, 2009). Enforcement of the law would essentially mean that owners of  educational institutes will have to provide free education to children coming from poor families. The observation is definitely appears to be a boon and a blessing as the old Hindu year departs for underprivileged and/or not so rich and likely to weave new dreams.

I personally feel that the judgement is likely to raise questions more than controversy. The landmark decision was pronounced by a three judge bench comprising of Chief Justice SH Kapadia and justices KS Radhakrishnan and Swatanter Kumar yesterday.

Indian School Children
Indian School Children

Many children and parents alike supported SC’s decision, Aryan (13) of DAV Public School near Anand Vihar, New Delhi raised his concerns of an immediate fee hike. He said, “If the poor starts studying with us free, the principal will definitely increase our fees.” On the other hand, The RTE act mandates that 25 percent seats should be offered to government and private unaided schools, across the country.  The apex court clarified that its judgement will come into force from April 12 but will only have a prospective affect and not retrospective affect. The bench reiterated that the act will apply uniformly to government and unaided private schools except unaided private minority schools.

Photo Source- worldbank DOT org

Saturday, May 09th, 2009 | Author:

A bunch of would be doctors beat up a nineteen year old fresher to death. An incident of Rajendra Prasad Medical College, Kangra, HP which shocked the nation can become an accident of the past, but the Supreme Court of India’s judgment is truly commendable. The court taking clue of “rampant alcoholism” at education places has directed counselling and de-addiction centres in all educational institutions as mandatory. Albeit how seriously we implement it is a different thing but what surprised me is the selection process of medical students. I have learnt that ragging is an accepted norm quite similar to a child being beaten up by his parents and not telling the world about it.

Quoting the father of deceased boy Aman from Delhi, Dr. Kachroo who said that people are usually indifferent to issues like ragging, unless something like this (death) happens. We do not realize that ragging leaves a scar on an impressionable mind. The cruelty meted out on student days manifests in some or the other ways. Rightly said Dr. Kachroo, I agree with you.

A complete degradation of values, I would say. Violence in any form leaves an indelible mark in a growing child’s brain and the actions are thrown in various ways. It can be the way he talks, the way he handles issues (at home or at work) or you can say it can affect his moral psyché.

Bullying or ragging – I accept is an old practice, but off late may be in the past ten years or so, the introduction of newcomers has taken a sharp turn (of course for worse). Victims suffer from long term emotional and behavioral problems, low self esteem and depression also. If I get inside the skin of a bully for a while I’d, I would say. ‘Once a bully always a bully’.

He may behave differently or sound unorthodox but his traits remain the same. A bully will be authoritative, envious and full of resent. A hazer (an American term of a bully) has insecurity combined with a hyper need to control or dominate peers.

Ragging is everywhere Army, Medical colleges, universities, schools, government offices, corporate blocks where violence is re-defined. Verbal assaults, fixated slang and rigid approach to life in general I’d interpret a bully. Do we need baggage? The court’s decision to separate drug users/ alcoholics from students and instate psychiatrist at educational institutions is the right approach to deal with this growing issue.